Actress Logan Browning (of Netflix's Dear White People) reads my New York Times Modern Love essay on love and circadian rhythms.

Can quantum mechanics describe a universe containing multiple observers, or is it a "single-user theory"? I give a talk at the University of Vienna for their lecture series on scientific realism.

How can we make sense of the universe when we're stuck inside of it? I spoke with physicist Lee Smolin.

I join Sean Carroll, Marcus Chown and Donna Roberts on the radio to discuss all things gravity with Colin McEnroe.

"Physics finds that the world is observer-dependent but remains silent on the nature of the observer. Cognitive science finds that the observer is an active participant but never questions the nature of the physical world. Enactivism might just be the concept we need to begin to piece the two sides together." My answer to this year's Edge Annual Question. 

"We made the most of the hours when our lives overlapped, then let each other thrive in our own times, like animals in our wilds." In my Modern Love essay for the New York Times, I discuss the challenges of love and romance in the face of delayed sleep phase disorder. 

Is there more than one universe out there? If so, will we ever know? More fun times on the smart and entertaining Colin McEnroe Show on NPR.

Nature's Brendan Maher offers an insightful close reading/story diagram of "The Man Who Tried to Redeem the World With Logic" for The Open Notebook. We also discuss the story behind the story in a Q&A

Did we evolve to see something other than reality? My interview with the provocative and fascinating cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman in Quanta. 

You know it's a new year when John Brockman asks scientists and thinkers its annual question at Edge.org. This year: What's the most interesting recent scientific news? For me, it's the emerging link between computational complexity and fundamental physics. 

The New York Times's David Brooks has honored "The Man Who Tried to Redeem the World with Logic" with a 2015 Sidney Award for long-form essay writing. 

I am excited to learn that my Nautilus article about Walter Pitts has won the first place Golden Giraffe for the best writing of 2015...in no small part because the prize was a giraffe stuffed with money. Many thanks to The Browser for this auricamelopardine honor.

Physics World has chosen Trespassing as its 2015 Book of the Year! It's a real honor, and I especially appreciate the comments that reviews editor Margaret Harris makes about the book in their podcast. Thanks, Physics World! 

I am truly honored to win the AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Silver Award in Magazine Writing, for my piece about Walter Pitts in Nautilus magazine. 

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